Cell signal boosters

As I anxiously await my GFC (May build), I’ve been thinking about improvements I want to make to my current camping rig. Getting a booster for cell phones is high on the list. Generally when I’m camping I have little need for streaming or other data use, but for safety I like to have a usable signal if possible. It just gets more complicated to let people know of my camp spot in case of emergency when there’s no service. (I’m also looking into InReach and Zoleo).

I’ve seen a couple builds on here that included cell boosters. I’m curious if people have a good solution that works both while driving and while in the tent?

Thanks!

I am a huge fan of my Garmin InReach. It does require a monthly subscription but if I need it in an emergency once it will all be worth it. Part of my decision to go with the InReach is 1) it’s portable if I ever need to leave the truck and hike out 2) Can communicate both emergency and non-emergency messages 3) Weather updates are available.

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This is the approach I’ve taken too. Very happy with my InReach.

I spent two months in the southwest last year, living out of my GFC. I used a Weboost that cost about $400 and was very happy with it. Like all cell boosters, if there is no signal, you are out of luck. But if you have anything coming in, you can boost it to a usable signal. I mounted my antenna to the back of my swing out tailgate, putting it up for camp and taking down when traveling. That was kind of a pain, so if I were to do it again, I’d mount it on the side like you see here: weBoost solutions and GFC
Not to hijack your thread, but since I’m home now, I’m selling my weboost for $325. PM me if interested.

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Great info definitely will be following this thread

There’s a few good mounting examples for the external antenna in that link you provided, thanks.

Think it would it be pretty easy to move the booster from the cab to the tent once setup or is it more of a fixed installation?

I never had any of it fixed. I moved it around several times. The key to the Weboost is that you have to keep the external antenna (the one on the pole) and it’s control box (the large box with the light on it) at least 5 or 6 feet from the smaller, square phone antenna. There is plenty of cable so that’s not a problem. You want to have your phone as close to the small antenna as possible I used to keep them about a half inch apart by putting both in a small plastic container. Once I had everything set up I powered it with the 12v cigarette lighter style plug on my Goal Zero 500x and tethered my laptop to my cell phone.
If you want to surf the web from up top, just bring the small antenna and your phone with you. Keep the rest of it outside/down below.

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Might not be helpful, but the vehicle hotspot in the 21 Tacomas is tied into the truck’s external antenna, so gets much better data rates when my phone is on 1 bar at remote sites, and I’ve used it for remote work and video calls from the campsite. The downside is you have to have the truck on accessory to operate, so I might still wind up getting a WeBoost that I could plug into my Jackery instead of working off truck power…